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The Clean Power Plan

By now I am sure you have heard about the new Clean Power Plan by President Obama. It’s goal is to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 2030. Here are some things it will do according to the White House page on the matter. Go to https://www.whitehouse.gov/climate-change if you want to see more.

 

PROTECT THE HEALTH OF AMERICAN FAMILIES. IN 2030, IT WILL:

Prevent up to 3,600 premature deaths

Prevent 1,700 non-fatal heart attacks

Prevent 90,000 asthma attacks in children

Prevent 300,000 missed workdays and school days

 

BOOST OUR ECONOMY BY:

Leading to 30 percent more renewable energy generation

in 2030

Creating tens of thousands of jobs

Continuing to lower the costs of renewable energy

 

SAVE THE AVERAGE AMERICAN FAMILY:

Nearly $85 a year on their energy bills in 2030

Save enough energy to power 30 million homes

in 2030

Save consumers $155 billion from 2020-2030

 

While those are are great things, what is the other side of it? Here is a little taste of the opposition on the matter from  Reuters.

 

What's missing? The president's plan lacks an opportunity to more fully engage the most central player in the debate over how best to address climate change issues: the private sector, and, specifically, the capital markets, our crucible of innovation.

By using a purely regulatory framework to fight climate change, the White House appears to be relying too heavily on caps and penalties as solutions when it could be taking better advantage of market-based mechanisms.

Worse, the regulation comes before we have all of the data; for example, many electric utilities don't adequately disclose their efficiency or carbon-emissions data publicly.

Moreover, the Environmental Protection Agency's new rule sets state-by-state caps on power-plant emissions. But, for most, the caps have been set so low, it is a nearly foregone conclusion that it will be easy for many states to achieve them, as most reductions already are built into existing renewable energy and demand-side management initiatives.

The rule also gives a high degree of latitude to each state for compliance, including potential cap-and-trade programs between states.

The issue is real but are penalties the answer to the problem? Is there a better way or do you like the President’s plan. Let us know!!

 

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Comments

This article is a bunch of politically motivated unsubstaniated crap!

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